Calgary

Red Deer man charged with driving double the speed limit and then protesting ticket at roadside

Red Deer RCMP say they charged a motorist for driving at extreme speeds of more than double the speed limit as well as protesting a summons afterward at the roadside.

Protesting ticket nearly caused three vehicles to collide, police say

The speeding incident took place March 12 on Ross Street near 46th Avenue in Red Deer. (Google Maps)

Red Deer RCMP say they charged a motorist for driving at extreme speeds of more than double the speed limit as well as protesting a summons afterward at the roadside.

According to a release, in mid-March RCMP used a stationary laser for speed enforcement on Ross Street near 46th Avenue in Red Deer.

Around 1:30 p.m. on March 12, a vehicle was travelling at 102 km/h in a 50 km/h zone, police said.

The vehicle was stopped by police and the driver was identified as a 34-year-old man from Red Deer, according to the news release.

Due to the extreme speed and risk to the public, the driver was summoned to court, police said.

However, after receiving the summons from the police, the driver returned to the roadside with a sign protesting the charge.

Police said this caused three vehicles to nearly collide.

The individual was directed to stop by police but continued to protest.

As a result, the driver was charged with engaging in a stunt likely to distract, startle or interfere with users of the roadway, which is a $567 fine.

"Citizens making the decision to travel at such extreme speeds pose a serious risk the public," said Sgt. Mike Zufferli with the Red Deer RCMP traffic unit in a release.

"These extreme speeds show a wanton disregard for the safety of others, and was exacerbated by this driver's actions where, in the middle of the day, in a heavily populated downtown core, chose to dangerously distract others."

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