Calgary

RCMP launches Name the Puppy 2016 contest

The RCMP is inviting children to suggest names for 13 German shepherd puppies that will be trained at an Alberta facility to become police dogs for the Mounties.

Police Dog Service Training Centre in Innisfail, Alta., expecting 13 new K9 recruits

The RCMP's Police Dog Service Training Centre in Innisfail is expecting 13 puppies to be born soon, so the Name the Puppy 2016 contest is now on. This was one of last year's new trainees. (RCMP)

The RCMP is inviting children to suggest names for 13 German shepherd puppies that will be trained as police dogs for the Mounties.

The dogs will be born at the Police Dog Service Training Centre in Innisfail, Alta. The deadline to enter the contest is March 22.

Here's a look at 2012 recruit Dane. (RCMP)

"When thinking of names, it is important to keep in mind that these are working police dogs, not pets," RCMP said in a release.

The rules are:

  • One entry per person.
  • The name can be for a male or a female dog.
  • It must start with the letter J.
  • It must have no more than nine letters.
  • It must be one or two syllables.
  • Contestants must live in Canada and be 14 years old or younger.
This is 2013 recruit Ephriam. (RCMP)

Submissions should include: the child's name, age, address, a telephone number and the suggested name.

Contestants can enter online or send a letter to:

  • Attn: "Name the Puppy Contest"
  • Police Dog Service Training Centre
  • Box 6120
  • Innisfail, AB
  • T4G 1S8

"If submitting by mail, children are invited to get creative with their entries," RCMP said. "We love to receive drawings and paintings!"

This is 2011 K9 unit recruit Cara. (RCMP)

The 13 children whose suggested names are chosen by PDSTC staff will be mailed a photo of the puppy they name, a toy dog named Justice, and an RCMP baseball cap.

Contest winners will be announced on April 26.

Names that aren't selected for the contest will be considered for other puppies born during the year. 

The dogs start their training when they are 16 to 20 months old. It takes anywhere from 42 to 85 days before they graduate as working dogs, said Staff Sgt. Eric. Stebenne. 

Here's a look at last year's recruits, who all got names starting with the letter H.

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