Calgary

Calgary looking at ways to curb Peace Bridge vandalism

City officials say they will review the placement of security cameras along the Peace Bridge after another incident of vandalism to the iconic span over the Bow River.

Repairs costs since 2012 total $300K but city says it has insurance to cover it

Broken glass along the Peace Bridge in Calgary. (Helen Pike/CBC)

City officials say they will review the placement of security cameras along the Peace Bridge after another incident of vandalism to the iconic span over the Bow River.

Police are investigating after vandals broke a pane of glass along the railing of the Peace Bridge earlier this month. Security footage shows five males on the bridge around 4 a.m. when it happened.

And it's not the first time glass panes have had to be replaced.

"We have done this in the past," said Charmaine Buhler, the city's manager of bridge maintenance.

"We have a contractor that is on board that helps us do this work. So it usually takes a week to replace."

The city says it has ramped up security since the bridge opened in 2012 because of repeated acts of vandalism. Security staff now do daily sweeps, and more high-resolution cameras have been installed.

The electronic security system even includes the capability to play audio over a loudspeaker, warning people to move along if need be — although it's never been used.

Coun. Druh Farrell says the ongoing vandalism is frustrating.

"We'd love to catch them," she said of the perpetrators.

Farrell questioned whether the security cameras could be placed move effectively. City staff said they will be evaluating the placement.

The city says it has spent nearly $300,000 replacing broken glass on the Peace bridge due to vandalism since 2012, and the costs are paid for through an internal insurance plan.

With files from Colleen Underwood

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