Calgary

New Alberta teachers get harsh grade from principals

New teachers are flirting with a failing grade in an annual survey on the state of education in Alberta.

Annual survey shows declining confidence in preparedness of education grads

An Alberta government report reveals 36 per cent of principals do not feel new education graduates are well prepared when they hit the classroom. (CBC)

New teachers are flirting with a failing grade in an annual survey on the state of education in Alberta.

A provincial government report reveals 36 per cent of principals do not feel new education grads are well prepared when they hit the classroom — up from 21 per cent in 2011.

Dianne Gereluk, the associate dean of undergraduate programs in department of education at the University of Calgary says there are other factors at play that could affect the ratings of new teachers. (CBC/Jennifer Lee)

Dianne Gereluk, associate dean of undergraduate programs in department of education at the University of Calgary, says increasing pressures in the classroom could be playing a role in the survey results.

"They're not prepared because there are broader political problems, broader support issues," she said. 

"There are more students in the classroom. There is less funding for those students who need more support in their learning. So they might be saying they're not prepared, but it might be taken out of context, and I think that's an important point."

Review of teaching standards

David Eggen, Alberta's education minister, says the skills required of teachers are constantly evolving and he will review the province's Teaching Quality Standard over the next year. Teachers are expected to meet the evolving standard throughout their careers.

"We are in the midst of consulting with our partners about how to enhance our Teaching Quality Standard," he said in a statement.

"I know our post-secondary institutions take great pride in the work they do preparing our aspiring educators to enter the classroom. Even still, the skillsets required in the profession are constantly evolving and this necessitates our discussions around the Teaching Quality Standard, which will span a year."

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