Nenshi says renaming Langevin Bridge an appropriate symbolic gesture

Mayor Naheed Nenshi says he is looking into the idea of renaming the Langevin Bridge over its link to residential schools. He said Calgary should do what it can to support a national reconciliation effort with Canada's aboriginal people

Hector-Louis Langevin was one of the architects of Canada's residential school system

The Langevin Bridge connects the community of Bridgeland to Calgary's downtown. (Google Maps)

Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi says he is looking into the idea of the city renaming the Langevin Bridge over its link to residential schools.

Mayor Nenshi says Canada has failed to share the prosperity and opportunity of Canada with aboriginal people. (CBC)

The bridge was named after Hector-Louis Langevin, who was one of the architects of the residential school system.

"I have been seeking different perspectives on this from First Nations people, from our advisory committee, from historians and so on about what that might look like and I really look forward to bringing something to this council in the upcoming weeks and months," he said.

Nenshi said finding a new name would be an appropriate symbolic gesture in the wake of the report by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC).

The commission's report, delivered last month, documents the role of the residential school system in the destruction of aboriginal cultures and languages through the assimilation of aboriginal children.

The report calls for Canada to move from apology to action to address the impact of the residential schools.

Nenshi says the city should do what they can to support a national reconciliation effort with Canada's aboriginal people.

Speaking at ceremonies held to mark the beginning of Aboriginal Awareness Days in Calgary, Mayor Nenshi said Canada's greatest failure has been its inability to share the prosperity and opportunities of this country with First Nations people.

Coun. Diane Colley-Urquhart has asked the city to look into what actions can be taken to improve life for urban aboriginals.

"Urban aboriginal issues have been around for a long time and been festering for a long time and it's really important that we commit ourselves to work more collaboratively and to find solutions and to invest in our First Nations communities," she said.