Calgary

Mayor Naheed Nenshi, former Alberta premier willing to help PM bridge western divide

Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi appeared to dismiss speculation of some type of formal federal appointment Sunday, saying he'd be prepared to aid the Trudeau government in gaining a better perspective on Alberta issues in an informal way.

But Nenshi says speculation about him being appointed in federal cabinet is "silly"

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, right, meets with the Mayor of Calgary, Naheed Nenshi, at the Federation of Canadian Municipalities annual conference, Friday, May 31, 2019 in Quebec City. (Jacques Boissinot/The Canadian Press)

Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi is willing to help bridge the current divide between western Canada and the federal government, but called speculation about him being appointed as a representative of — or adviser for — Alberta in federal cabinet "silly."

"No job has been offered, nor no job has been contemplated," Nenshi told CTV's Question Period in an interview aired Sunday.

"Probably it's wrong, but I am enjoying all this speculation because it's so silly."

Nenshi said he'd be prepared to aid the Trudeau government in gaining a better perspective on Alberta issues in an informal way, but appeared to lay down a few ground rules for his cooperation.

Calling separatist rumblings in Alberta "very real," Nenshi said he spoke with Trudeau about a range of issues seen in the West as irritants in a call he received from the prime minister on Wednesday.

"Of course the (Trans Mountain) pipeline has to get built, of course we need to re-examine Bill C-69 which my premier calls the No More Pipelines Bill, but is actually much more dangerous than that," Nenshi said.

The popular three-time mayor warned that Bill C-69, known as the Impact Assessment Act, would make it much more difficult to build not just pipelines, but other infrastructure projects as well.

The Trudeau Liberals were shut out of Alberta and Saskatchewan in the Oct. 21 election amid growing frustration with federal policies affecting the oilpatch, leading to questions about how the prime minister would provide representation of the two provinces in his cabinet, which is to be sworn in Nov. 20.

Comments made by Trudeau since the election triggered speculation that he might turn to Nenshi to be a voice for the West in cabinet.

Former Alberta premier Alison Redford has also been tabbed as a potential Trudeau confidant, and said she's willing to lend the federal Liberals a hand in addressing the gap in western representation.

"I haven't been asked. I am happy to help in any way," she told CTV's Question Period.

"This is something Canadians have been thinking about for a long time and I think the key is that there has to be a lot of voices at the table."

Bill C-69, designed to change the way the federal government reviews major projects, including oil and gas pipelines, became a key focal point of discontent expressed by Albertans during the federal election campaign.

Oil industry executives have warned the legislation will halt economic growth in Canada, particularly in the West as companies struggle to get bitumen to markets other than the United States.

With files from CTV

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