Interchange at Macleod and 25th rejected as city tries to alleviate commuter woes

Plans for an interchange that would raise 25th over Macleod come with a $100 million price tag and serious impacts on the local community. A city committee voted on Wednesday to axe that idea and ask for other options.

Possible solutions include elevated tracks, extending the tunnel and moving the avenue

One of the options presented for the intersection at Macleod Trail and 25th Avenue features a roadway realigned further north. (City of Calgary screengrab)

There are some days when it feels like you could dash into the Humpty's and grab a bite before eventually making it to the lights on 25th Avenue and Macleod Trail, as C-Train arms rise and fall, rise and fall.

It's something city council wants to fix, but it won't be easy. Or cheap.

Plans for an interchange that would raise 25th over Macleod come with a $100 million price tag and serious impacts on the local community. A city committee voted on Wednesday to axe that idea and ask for other options. 

The intersection is unique, with a C-Train line that exits a tunnel under the Union Cemetery just in time to cross 25th Avenue, before hitting the Erlton-Stampede station.

Commuter hopes are often dashed, with green lights quickly turning red as another train approaches.

Elevated track

Coun. Shane Keating said council will look at other ways to deal with traffic and pedestrian woes. 

"The road may not be elevated. It may be that the LRT needs to be elevated," he said. 

That would mean that a C-Train coming out of the cemetery hill tunnel would have to go over 25th Avenue to an elevated station, and then back down to street level north of the Elbow River.

There's also the possibility of running the C-Train under 25th Avenue, or even moving the avenue. 

"Not only is it the cars and vehicles we want to be able to move better, but we also want to move the C-Train better. We also want to move pedestrians and cyclists better," said Keating, on investigating other options. 

"So it actually is both — better use, better connectivity to all of these and lower costs."

With files from Scott Dippel