Calgary

Wild horse stuck in muddy bog is alive and kicking thanks to some determined rescuers

A young wild horse likely wouldn't have survived the night if a group of animal lovers hadn't stumbled across the filly struggling — and failing — to drag itself out of a two-metre deep mud hole.

'She probably would not have survived the night'

This young wild horse that got itself stuck in a muddy wet bog near Sundre, Alta., was rescued by a passing group of horse enthusiasts on Wednesday. 1:17

A young wild horse is alive and kicking thanks to the efforts of a group of animal lovers who happened to find it hopelessly stuck in a muddy bog in southern Alberta earlier this week.

Several members of the Help Alberta Wildies Society (HAWS) were out looking Wednesday for new foals near Sundre, Alta., north of Calgary, when they found the filly struggling — and failing — to drag itself out of a two-metre deep mud hole with ice around the edges.

"Had we not come by at that particular time, she probably would not have survived the night," said Darrell Glover.

"From her size, she appears to be about two. And she would have been with a full band of horses, which had left her. So she was abandoned for some time."

  • Watch how the dramatic rescue operation unfolded in the video above.

It took almost an hour, but the group was able to use ropes attached to their ATVs and wrapped around and under the filly to gently pull her out of the hole.

Glover said it was obvious the horse was exhausted and very, very hungry.

"She had nipped every little blade of grass and weeds and anything that was within her reach," he said.

Darrell Glover prepares to rescue the two-year-old filly from a muddy hole in southern Alberta. (Darrell Glover)

Even once she was out, rather than run away, she put her head down and started grazing, Glover said.

"She was getting quite used to us," he said. "She knew we were trying to help her."

Glover said that while she might not catch up again with her old band, the filly will likely hook up with a bachelor stallion.

"I think she's going to be fine," he said.

With files from Rick Donkers

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.