Calgary

Alberta family doctor ordered to pay $70K for 'unprofessional conduct'

A family doctor in Cochrane, Alta., has been found guilty of unprofessional conduct by the province's medical regulator and ordered to pay $70,241 for the costs of the investigation into his behaviour and the hearing.

Dr. Habeeb Tunde Ali was found guilty of three charges by the province's medical regulator

A Cochrane, Alta., doctor has been reprimanded and fined by the province's medical regulator. (CBC)

A family doctor in Cochrane, Alta., has been found guilty of unprofessional conduct by the province's medical regulator and ordered to pay $70,241 for the costs of the investigation into his behaviour and the hearing.

The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta found that Dr. Habeeb Tunde Ali was guilty of three charges under the college's standards of practice and the Canadian Medical Association's code of ethics:

  • Failure to pay his annual fees of $1,800 to the college.
  • Failure to comply with the rules of an agreement that let him return to his practice, after his licence was suspended for unbecoming conduct in 2008.
  • Failure to accurately report his income post-bankruptcy.

Ali's licence was suspended in 2008 after he had a sexual relationship with a patient and fathered a child with her. He was allowed to return to his work as long as he agreed to meet regularly with a psychiatrist.

But the hearing found that Ali said that no dates for appointments were ever convenient, and he never suggested alternative dates.

It also said that he self-reported his income to his bankruptcy trustee as $15,000 per month, despite receiving an average gross monthly income of $26,624 per month from Alberta Health Care.

The hearing was told by the lawyer representing the complaints director of the college that there were no issues related to Ali's patient care, but that the charges against him were still in the public interest because of the importance of integrity and trust in the medical profession.

The college's role is to hold doctors to ethical and medical practice standards and investigate complaints against them.

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