Calgary

Fatbike single-track trails groomed at Canmore Nordic Centre for first time this winter

For the first time this winter, the Canmore Nordic Centre is offering up more than half of its single-track mountain-bike trails specifically for the growing snow sport known as fatbiking.

Increasingly popular sport being welcomed with specific amenities in Alberta provincial park

Fatbiking in Alberta parks

7 years ago
Duration 0:34
The Canmore Nordic Centre is offering up bike trails specifically for the growing snow sport known as fatbiking.

For the first time this winter, the Canmore Nordic Centre is offering up more than half of its single-track mountain-bike trails specifically for the growing snow sport known as fatbiking.

"Fatbiking has become a very popular outdoor activity in the wintertime," said Michael Roycroft, area manager for the Canmore Nordic Centre Provincial Park.

"We're trying to acknowledge that and also encourage it."

Roycroft said the facility's regular summer trails have been adapted for fatbikes — mountain bikes fitted with extra-wide, "fat" tires designed for riding on packed snow and ice — and are mapped and designated for various skill levels.

Alberta Parks says its planners and facility operators have watched the sport grow "exponentially" over the past several years.

Environment and Parks Minister Shannon Phillips described the Canmore Nordic Centre trails as an "example of how our parks system is responsive to emerging recreation groups and supports multi-use activities."

Don't forget bear spray

For the first time, the Canmore Nordic Centre is offering up more than half of its single-track mountain-bike trails this winter specifically groomed for fatbiking. (Radio-Canada)

The trails are free to use and open to the general public.

Roycroft said fatbike rentals are also available on-site, for a fee.

Riders using the trails are encouraged to travel in groups of two or more, and carry bear spray.

"Although the bears are hibernating for the most part in the wintertime, there are cougars out," Rycroft said.

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