Drunken birds means annual increase in window collisions

It's always recommended to keep your feet on the ground when you're drunk. You should, under no circumstances, take flight. Unfortunately, birds are terrible listeners, and don't even try talking to one that's been into the fermented berries.

Mountain ash berries fermenting on trees leads to more calls at rehabilitation centre

Bohemian waxwings like to feed on Mountain Ash berries, leading to some terrible, drunken flying.

It's always recommended to keep your feet on the ground when you're drunk. You should, under no circumstances, take flight. Unfortunately, birds are terrible listeners, and don't even try talking to one that's been into the fermented berries. 

The Alberta Institute for Wildlife Conservation said each year it sees a spike in admissions due to birds flying into windows after eating mountain ash berries, or what the organization calls "boozy berries."

"Mountain ash berries stay on trees much longer than other berries and songbirds such as bohemian waxwings and crossbills gorge on the food source and sometimes, as a result, hit windows," said AIWC in a press release. 

While that sounds about as funny as a certain uncle smashing his head into a window at Thanksgiving dinner, it can have equally not-so-funny consequences.

Reduce collisions

AIWC, which rehabilitates injured wildlife, advises placing birds who have struck windows "in a cardboard box with holes punched in it and left in a warm, dark and quiet place for up to an hour to see if they are able to get their bearings on their own."

If that doesn't work, the centre will accept injured wildlife at its rehabilitation centre. The public can contact the organization at 403-946-2361.

AIWC also said collisions can be reduced by placing decals on windows or partially closing drapes or blinds. 

There is no advice on what to do with your uncle.