Calgary

Chantal Kreviazuk, Raine Maida share painful and wonderful journey of collaboration in new doc

It was incredibly painful but necessary. When Chantal Kreviazuk and Raine Maida set out to make an album, they did a documentary and say the emotions on display are raw and made it into the music.

'I was in a full-blown raging depression being that far from the kids,' Kreviazuk shares

Chantal Kreviazuk and Raine Maida have a new documentary out, I’m Going to Break Your Heart, about the pain and beauty in developing an album together while separated from their children and home. (Ellis Choe/CBC)

It was incredibly painful but necessary.

When Chantal Kreviazuk and Raine Maida set out to make an album, they did a documentary, too, and say the emotions on display are raw and made it into the music.

Solo artist Kreviazuk and Maida of Our Lady Peace were together referred to as Canada's beautiful young rock royalty. More than 20 years and three children later, they wanted to, in a sense, pick up musically where they left off as a duo.

"It was about trying to capture the process of writing and recording an album, because we had never done that together. We've written for other people but this is the first time we were going to make an album together," Maida told The Homestretch.

"We wrote a song six or seven years ago and we felt like it was amazing. It's called, I Love It When You Make Me Beg. We thought, naturally, over the next few months, we will just finish an album. It never happened. So we have to go 4,000 miles from our home in Los Angeles, from our kids and dogs, and sequester ourselves in this little hotel room on an island. It brought all these other challenges."

The pair headed to St-Pierre-Miquelon, an archipelago near Newfoundland, which is part of France.

Kreviazuk says it was incredibly difficult.

"I was in a full-blown raging depression being that far from the kids. 'What am I doing?' And yet there was this job to do. I think we brought that suffering into each song. Like it or not, conscious or not, that's what came into it," she said.

"I learned every couple should be filmed and watch it back. You don't see the looks on faces and you don't hear the tone [at the time it's happening]."

The product, an album and a behind-the-scenes documentary, I'm Going to Break Your Heart, is deeply personal, Maida said.

"In the midst of that you capture other things. When you look back at all the footage, it's really difficult to remove the personal stuff, what happens together outside of the music, because it is so intrinsic to the songs and the lyrics," Maida said.

What's captured on film isn't Instagram-ready, Kreviazuk said.

"A lot of our society now is only showing 'after the filter' and the best picture out of 2,000 shots. That is just crap. It is not true," she said.

But the time together was worth every minute, Maida added.

"The process was a little bumpy, but at the end of the day, sitting on the stage playing these songs with Chantal is incredible."

Canadian musicians Raine Maida and Chantal Kreviazuk made headlines when they started dating. They're both Juno award winners...he's the lead vocalist for Our Lady Peace and she's a solo artist. Almost 20 years and three children later - like MOST couples - they faced challenges in their marriage. But unlike most couples, they decided to make a documentary about it -- while creating a new album, a new book and a podcast too! The documentary is called, 'I'm Going to Break Your Heart,' and it premieres tonight in Calgary at a sold out show at the National Music Centre. They joined host Doug Dirks in studio to tell us all about it. 7:56

With files from The Homestretch and Ellis Choe.

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