Calgary

Cardston votes to keep booze ban

A ban on alcohol sales that has been in place since Alberta first became a province will remain in effect in the southern Alberta town of Cardston.

Residents of mostly Mormon town south of Calgary reject alcohol sales in plebiscite

In a plebiscite on Monday, voters in the town of Cardston rejected the idea of allowing the sale of alcohol. (Google Street View)

A ban on alcohol sales that has been in place since Alberta first became a province will remain in effect in the southern Alberta town of Cardston.

The predominantly Mormon community, 240 kilometres south of Calgary, has been dry for the past 109 years.

The religion prohibits drinking coffee, tea and alcohol, and teaches that Sundays are holy and should be about reflection.

Local business owners pushed for the non-binding plebiscite, saying they are losing business to other communities that allow the sale of booze.

They wanted restaurants to be able to sell liquor with a meal, as well as the local golf course or the recreational facility.

But Monday's vote was clear 1,089 against booze and just 347 for it.

Residents also voted against allowing sporting events at town fields and facilities on Sundays.

The idea of allowing backyard hens in town was rejected by a margin of 1,108 to 317.

A question about whether fluoride should be added to the town’s drinking water got a closer result 732 in favour, 703 against. 

(Google )

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