Canada Post employee charged in erratic, naked driving spree in Calgary

A Canada Post employee has been charged criminally, accused of an erratic, naked driving spree in a company truck in Calgary earlier this month, CBC News has confirmed.

There are mental health concerns for the 35-year-old Calgary man who faces dangerous driving charge

A naked man driving a Canada Post van struck up to eight vehicles on Crowchild Trail in Calgary on July 4, 2018. (Julie Debeljak/CBC)

A Canada Post employee has been charged criminally, accused of an erratic, naked driving spree in a company truck in Calgary earlier this month, CBC News has confirmed.

The 35-year-old man was charged with dangerous operation of a motor vehicle after the incident on Crowchild Trail during rush hour on July 4.

CBC News has decided not to name the accused based on information that there are serious concerns for his mental health. 

Sources confirm to CBC News that the man is a delivery agent for Canada Post but a spokesperson said the organization would not comment as the case is before the courts.

It was around 5 p.m. on the Wednesday afternoon when several calls came in to police reporting a Canada Post truck driving erratically along Crowchild Trail south of Glenmore Trail.

The truck struck about eight other vehicles before the driver stopped, got out and entered a convenience store.

When the man came out of the store, he was taken into police custody and paramedics were brought in to assess his condition.

Mental health and court

Serious mental health issues can affect how a person's criminal charges play out in court and whether an accused person receives treatment or is sent to jail.

Assessments done by forensic psychiatrists and psychologists can help a judge determine whether an accused is mentally fit to stand trial, meaning whether the person understands the court process and can instruct his or her lawyer. 

A judge could also find an accused not criminally responsible (NCR), which would mean he was unable to appreciate right from wrong at the time of the incident. 

"This decision is complex and therefore is best left to the courts, which is why charges are usually laid for serious offences even when mental health is believed to be a major factor in what occurred," said Calgary police spokesperson Corwin Odland.

The accused is next due in court in September.

About the Author

Meghan Grant

CBC Calgary reporter

Meghan Grant is the courts and crime reporter for CBC Calgary.