Calgary

Be extra careful around rain-swollen Elbow and Bow rivers, Calgarians warned

City officials have issued a high stream flow advisory for the Elbow River, effective immediately, as a stubborn rain-soaked weather system remains stuck over the city.

Some areas of Fish Creek Provincial Park are flooding

A high stream flow advisory has been issued for the Elbow River after several consecutive hours of rainfall. (Mike Symington/CBC)

City officials have issued a high stream flow advisory for the Elbow River, effective immediately, as a stubborn rain-soaked weather system remains stuck over the city.

The Calgary Fire Department is reminding people to take care around both of Calgary's major rivers, which are running higher and faster than normal.

On Friday afternoon, Alberta Parks said Fish Creek Provincial Park in the city's south was flooding, with some trails washed out and others incurring significant damage.

Officials are closely monitoring the flow rate along the Elbow and Bow rivers, says spokeswoman Carol Henke.

"Where there's water, there's risk. These elevated flow rates dramatically increase the risk to those who are in and around the Elbow River, and so we are issuing this advisory," she said.

Several straight hours of rain, plus mountain snowmelt runoff, has swollen the Bow and Elbow rivers in Calgary. (Mike Symington/CBC)

Henke says the river's edge might also be unstable due to erosion, so children and pets should steer clear.

The city had to close Confederation Park in the northwest because of some localized flooding.

There are detours along some pathways for cyclists and pedestrians.

Environment Canada says Calgary typically gets 50 to 55 millimetres of rain in the entire month of May. 

But from Wednesday through Friday evening, the city could get very close to that, senior climatologist David Phillips said. 

The lagoon area on St. Patrick's Island park is creeping up the stairs as the rainfall persists. (Mike Symington/CBC)

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