Calgary

248 charges laid against 43 people in Calgary meth crackdown

Dubbed the Daylight Initiative, the program is trying to stem the rising tide of meth use through investigation, enforcement, public education and community support, according to police.

Calgary police say the Daylight Initiative is meant to stem the rising tide of meth use in the city

Some of the weapons seized by Calgary police during a crackdown on methamphetamine in the city. (Calgary Police Service)

Calgary police say they've arrested 43 people and laid 248 charges as part of a crackdown on methamphetamine in the city. 

Dubbed the Daylight Initiative, the program is trying to stem the rising tide of meth use through investigation, enforcement, public education and community support, according to police. 

The latest arrests and charges took place in January and February and relate to street-level trafficking as well as trafficking from residential homes, according to police. 

"The trafficking of drugs in our city happens not only in the downtown, but also in the vast majority of communities in our city. This is a complex social issue that will take a collective effort to resolve," said Insp. Kevin Forsen in a news release. 

"Enforcement is only one part of the equation and we will remain dedicated to doing what we can to keep our citizens safe."

Weapons and drugs

Police say they seized everything from crack cocaine to LSD to marijuana while executing search warrants throughout the city.

The service says it seized 79.4 grams of meth.

In addition to the drugs, police say they also seized:

  • Two handguns.
  • One shotgun.
  • Three replica handguns.
  • Brass knuckles.
  • Nine knives.
  • Crossbow.
  • Baton.

One person was arrested twice in two separate investigations related to the Daylight Initiative, according to police. 

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