Calgary

Federal electoral reform meeting in Calgary has some looking for change

Calgarians had a chance to weigh in on electoral reform this weekend at the last stop of a national discussion tour, just days after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau appeared to flip flop on the issue despite campaigning on overhauling Canada’s voting system.

‘It seems recently that the Liberal government has been walking back their ideas on electoral reform.'

About 70 Calgarians participated in a town hall meeting on electoral reform Saturday. (Terri Trembath/CBC)

Calgarians had a chance to weigh in on electoral reform this weekend at the last stop of a national discussion tour, just days after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau appeared to flip flop on the issue despite campaigning on overhauling Canada's voting system.

Federal Minister of Democratic Institutions Maryam Monsef led a town hall dialogue with about 70 Calgarians Saturday afternoon.

"I understand this is not the first thing people think of when they get out of bed and it's not the last thing but it really, really matters," Monsef said.

Right now Canada has a 'first past the post' system. In each riding the party that gets the most votes wins, which means a party can win even if it doesn't have a majority.

Federal Minister of Democratic Institutions Maryam Monsef, led a town hall dialogue with about 70 Calgarians Saturday afternoon. (Terri Trembath/CBC)

Justin Trudeau's Liberals won with only 39 per cent of the total votes in the 2015 federal election.

Ranked ballots and proportional representation are among the alternatives.

Participant Brie Nelson wants to see change.

"I'm sure there's a better way to do this. I can see the value in why the decisions and the system that we have was made, but I think it needs to change because it's not serving everybody," Nelson told CBC News.

Calgarian Brie Nelson wants the electoral reform she was promised by Justin Trudeau, as she attends a town hall meeting in Calgary on the issue this weekend. (Terri Trembath/CBC)

Feedback from these forums along with an all-party committee report due in December will form legislation the Liberals plan to introduce in the spring.

But if passed, it would still take about two years to implement.

Nelson, while looking for change, is hoping to hold politicians to account for election promises.

Federal Minister of Democratic Institutions Maryam Monsef, led a town hall dialogue with about 70 Calgarians Saturday afternoon. (Terri Trembath/CBC)

"I am really glad to see this happening on a federal level. Specifically I was motivated to come out today because it seems recently that the Liberal government has been walking back their ideas on electoral reform and I am very frustrated by that. I need them to stick to those guns," she said.

"They made a promise and I want it to be fulfilled."

With files from Terri Trembath

now