Calgary

No, the City of Calgary is not using helicopters to spray the streets with disinfectant

No, the City of Calgary is not spraying disinfectant from helicopters to slow the spread of COVID-19.

The city debunked the hoax in a tweet

No, Calgary is not using helicopters to disinfect the city from COVID-19. (Scott Dippel/CBC)

The City of Calgary is not spraying disinfectant from helicopters to slow the spread of COVID-19.

"We've heard rumours about how we are disinfecting the city. We are not spraying throughout the night or using helicopters to disinfect areas. You can help prevent the spread of coronavirus by washing your hands and most importantly maintaining a two meter physical distance," the city wrote on Twitter on Tuesday evening.

It's not clear where the hoax originated, but CBC News was sent a copy of a text message that appeared to spread the disinformation.

The message warns Calgarians to stay indoors after 11:40 p.m. and shut their doors and windows. It was not immediately clear where the message originated — as the person who received the message said it was forwarded to them by a friend, and that friend said it was passed along by another friend. 

CBC News was sent this copy of a text message that a Calgarian received. The city is not spraying disinfectant in the area, and it's not clear where the hoax originated. (Submitted to CBC)

While misting disinfectant by drone has been used to respond to the novel coronavirus in South Korea, it's not yet a measure that has been taken in any Canadian city — and it's unclear how effective the tactic actually is. 

The City of Calgary is under a state of emergency due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and has a list of measures it's taking to respond on its website, like ramping up cleaning and closing some facilities. 

As the novel coronavirus has spread around the world, so has misinformation. 

In recent weeks, a Calgary talk radio host and a naturopathy clinic have been criticized for sharing false information stating there is a cure for the virus. 

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.