Calgary

Summertime, and the livin' is ... wet and chilly, in Calgary

It’s been a rainy, breezy and not-very-warm July so far in Calgary, but there’s still a chance we could at least break the average mark with some actual summer temperatures finally in the forecast for next week.

Warmer temperatures in forecast for next week, but still could be cooler-than-normal summer

It's not your imagination — July in Calgary has been cooler and wetter than usual, Environment Canada says, (CBC)

It's been a rainy, breezy and not very warm July in Calgary so far, but there's still a chance we could at least break the average mark with some actual summer temperatures finally in the forecast for next week.

The average maximum temperature so far this month in the city is 20.9 C, Environment Canada data shows.

In Calgary, the average temperature in July, with daytime high and overnight low put together, has been about 15.5 C — that's a full degree below normal.

"A degree doesn't sound like a lot, but it requires a number of cooler days in order to bring those averages down," said Environment Canada meteorologist Dan Kulak.

And while July is only half over, Calgary has already had as much rain as it normally gets in the whole month, he added.

The average for the whole month is 66.5 millimetres of rain. So far this July, Calgary has recorded 69 mm.

Kulak says we can blame the disappointing weather on a stubborn trough of lower pressure that's stuck over the province.

"I think in general we have not had the strong upper ridge pattern over Western Canada or the western Prairies so far this summer," he said.

"When we get these strong ridges of high pressure at the upper levels of the atmosphere over top of Alberta is when we usually see those high 20s and low 30s type of readings. And we just haven't had that so far this summer."

The situation is looking up for next week, at least.

It's supposed to get quite a bit warmer, with a high of 26 C on Sunday and Monday, 28 C on Tuesday and 29 C by Wednesday, Environment Canada forecasts.

Still, Kulak said the agency's 28-day outlook is showing much of Alberta is likely going to be in the cooler-to-normal range.