Calgary

Central Library makes Time magazine's list of World's 100 Greatest Places of 2019

One of Calgary’s newest public buildings is already being declared an icon, as Time magazine has added the new Central Library to its 2019 list of the 100 Greatest Places.

Magazine notes natural light, cedar walls, curved facade meant to evoke Chinook arches

The exterior view of Calgary's new Central Library, which opened in 2018. (Michael Grimm)

One of Calgary's newest public buildings is already being declared an icon, as Time magazine has added the new Central Library to its 2019 list of the World's 100 Greatest Places.

The magazine gives credit to Norwegian architectural firm Snohetta, and makes note of the beautiful materials and esthetic, noting it is "flooded with natural light and features several esthetic odes to its native land: walls made of cedar from nearby British Columbia, a curved facade meant to evoke cloud arches formed by the region's Chinook winds."

The Central Library staff shared its excitement on Twitter.

Calgary's Central Library has already received kudos from Architectural Digest, which named it one of the most futuristic new libraries in the world, and Azure magazine, which called it the best "civic landmark" built in 2018.

The library was built at a cost of $245 million and opened in late 2018.

But it has also faced criticism — not over its looks, but over its functionality, with questions raised about the awkward main steps and the fact that it's not easily accessible from the street.

Calgary's Central Library has gained international recognition by being named in Time magazine's elite list of the World's 100 Greatest Places of 2019. (Michael Grimm)

But few have criticized its interior, which features an oval design, curved wood accents and abundant natural light.

Time also noted the library's role as an educational centre — "offering learning labs, residency programs and even a digital production studio built for podcasters and YouTubers." 

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.