National Energy Board rejects Burnaby's bid to stop work at Trans Mountain pipeline terminal

The National Energy Board has rejected a request by Burnaby, B.C., that it rescind orders allowing the company building the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion to conduct work at the city's terminal.

Metro Vancouver city asked that board cancel the orders after Federal Court of Appeal quashed approval

The Trans Mountain marine terminal in Burnaby, B.C. The National Energy Board has rejected a request by the city that it rescind orders letting the company building the pipeline expansion to do work at the terminal. (Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press)

The National Energy Board has rejected a request by Burnaby, B.C., that it rescind orders allowing the company building the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion to conduct work at the city's terminal.

The Metro Vancouver city had asked that the board cancel the orders after the Federal Court of Appeal quashed government approval for the expansion project.

Burnaby had argued the terminal work was primarily related to the project, but the board said in a written decision Thursday that it's upholding the orders, allowing Trans Mountain Corp. to do infrastructure work at the Burnaby Terminal.

The NEB says piping modifications are not associated with the expansion project and the relocation and decommissioning orders appropriately allow Trans Mountain to optimize the site in preparation to offer new services to shippers.

The board also allowed the company to continue tree clearing as part of the approved work.

Burnaby has been a long-standing opponent of the pipeline expansion, which would substantially increase tanker traffic in the waters around the city, and it was among the plaintiffs in the Federal Court of Appeal case against the project.

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