Calgary

Brian Jean says Montreal mayor 'interfering' with Energy East pipeline process

Wildrose Party leader Brian Jean says he's fed up with Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre for "interfering" with the National Energy Board's independent review process of the Energy East pipeline.

Brian Jean says Denis Coderre has 'no right' to do independent review of Energy East pipeline

Alberta Wildrose Leader Brian Jean says the cancellation of Energy East hearings in Montreal Monday shows that NDP plan to appease anti-pipeline activists isn't working. (Jason Franson/The Canadian Press)

Alberta's Wildrose Party Leader Brian Jean says he's fed up with Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre for "interfering" with the National Energy Board's independent review process of the Energy East pipeline.

Coderre questions the impartiality of the current process after learning ex-Quebec premier Jean Charest met the chairman and two commissioners of the NEB while working for TransCanada, the company heading the project.

The NEB says it wasn't aware of Charest's relationship with TransCanada when they met with him.  

Jean says this is another case of unnecessary interruption.

"A politician who dumps raw sewage into his city's fresh waterways while accepting billions of dollars in equalization from Alberta taxpayers has no right to cast judgment on the independent National Energy Board process," said in a release.

The Alberta politician is calling for Coderre to immediately step away from this independent review.

"The NEB hearings should continue, and I am confident the science of pipeline safety will win the day."

Past opposition

The Montreal Metropolitan Community announced their opposition to the pipeline in January.

"We are against it because it still represents significant environmental threats and too few economic benefits for greater Montreal," said Coderre.

After the hearings, the NEB must submit its report by March 2018 after which the federal cabinet will have the final say on the project.

The $15.7-billion Energy East pipeline would carry 1.1 million barrels a day of western crude as far east as Saint John, serving domestic refineries and international customers.

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