Calgary

Real Honorio apologizes to Bolsa murder victim's family at sentencing hearing

In front of his family and two fellow gangsters, confessed killer Real Honorio made a lengthy apology for the "pain and anguish" he caused the family of Keni Su'a.

Calgary gangster faces life sentence, judge to decide on parole ineligibility at later date

Real Christian Honorio faces a life sentence with no chance of parole for 10-25 years. (CBC)

In front of his family and two fellow gangsters, confessed killer Real Honorio made a lengthy apology for the "pain and anguish" he caused the family of Keni Su'a.

Su'a was one of the innocent bystanders killed in Calgary's gang war that lasted between 2002 and 2009 and left at least 25 people dead.

"I know no words can be said to fill the void and sorrow I have caused," said Honorio at the end of his sentencing hearing on Wednesday.

Honorio pleaded guilty to killing Su'a, shooting him down as he ran from the Bolsa Restaurant on New Year's Day 2009 as gunfire erupted inside.

The Bolsa Restaurant triple murder involved the kidnapping of rival gang associate Aaron Bendle, who was taken to the restaurant and used to lure Sanjeev Mann — the intended target of the killing. 

Bendle and Mann were also killed that day.

Honorio called his participation in that gang war "a chapter of my life I was blind to see what was in front of me."

Though Honorio spoke of moving forward, friends from his violent past showed up to watch his statement.

Fellow FOB gangsters Henry and Troung Nguyen — who were at the courthouse for their own matters on Wednesday — sat in the gallery. 

Last September, Henry was shot on his way to the courthouse.

"I have taken steps with the help of god, family and friends to move forward with my life, to rehabilitate myself, to be a better person," said Honorio.

'I'm sorry for the Su'a family'

Though a second-degree murder conviction comes with an automatic life sentence, lawyers on both sides have been making submissions this week on when Honorio can ask for parole.

Crown prosecutors Steven Johnston and Adam May proposed a parole ineligibility of 20 years while Honorio's lawyers, Tonii Roulston and Andrea Urquhart, asked the judge to consider 12 years.

A date for Justice William Tilleman to make his decision will be set later this month.

Though none of Su'a's family were in court on Wednesday, Honorio asked for their forgiveness.

"I'm sorry for the Su'a family and his loved ones for unspeakable pain I have inflicted."

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