Calgary

The great Barbie heist: 36 vintage dolls snatched from Calgary collector

Scarlett O'Hara, Lucille Ball, and Marilyn Monroe have all gone missing — from Brandi Boothman's collection of Barbies.

Dozens of valuable dolls were the target of a break-in at a condo storage locker

One of Brandi Boothman's stolen Barbie dolls that was taken when her storage locker was broken into in January. (Brandi Boothman)

Scarlett O'Hara, Lucille Ball and Marilyn Monroe have all gone missing — from Brandi Boothman's Barbie collection.

She'd been keeping them in storage at her Aspen Woods condo, but last week she found her storage locker forced open and all 36 dolls gone.

Boothman had been collecting different versions of the iconic doll for thirty years.

  • Scroll down to see more of Boothman`s prized collection

"I have absolutely no idea why I was targeted, but it must have been someone who realizes they were worth something because that was all they took," she said Monday morning on the Calgary Eyeopener.

All the dolls were in their original boxes and included some rare editions, including a Gone With The Wind collection.

The Barbies had come from all over the world, including dolls from Australia and India.

"In mid-December I was attempting to make more space at home and thought perhaps I'll pack them up," she said.

"My plan was hopefully to give them to someone I knew who had a little girl, to pass them down."

The dolls are worth between $2,000 and $2,500 but Boothman says it's the emotional connection that is more valuable to her.

"It was a hobby, something we did together — me and my Mom — something beautiful that I loved as a child."

Boothman says Calgary police have been informed and she's been overwhelmed by the huge response on social media after she posted about the theft on Facebook, resulting in hundreds of shares and offers of help.

(Brandi Boothman)
(Brandi Boothman)
(Brandi Boothman)
(Brandi Boothman)
(Brandi Boothman)
(Brandi Boothman)
(Brandi Boothman)
(Brandi Boothman)
(Brandi Boothman)


With files from the Calgary Eyeopener

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