Calgary

Man who firebombed Calgary family and tortured landlord now on trial for murder

A second-degree murder trial got underway Monday for a Calgary criminal with a lengthy record for extreme violence.

Armando Baccari, 40, accused in 2017 shooting death of Arnold Kerfont

Arnold Kerfont, 44, was shot to death in 2017. Armando Pepino Baccari was found not guilty of 2nd-degree murder after the judge found it plausible he was acting in self-defence. (countryhillscrematorium.ca)

A second-degree murder trial got underway Monday for a Calgary criminal with a lengthy record for extreme violence.

Armando Pepino Baccari, 40, is accused in the 2017 shooting death of Arnold Kerfont.

Baccari has previous convictions for participating in the firebombing of a Calgary family and a beating so violent, it was described in court as "torture."

On Oct. 14, 2017, Kerfont and his girlfriend were fighting on the street in the northwest neighborhood of Montgomery. One witness said Kerfont was physically attacking the woman.

At some point, Baccari pulled up in a car and got out. It's unclear why but the two men then began fighting. 

'What are you going to do, shoot me?'

The conflict turned physical and Kerfont kicked Baccari in the head, prosecutor Matt Dalidowicz said in his opening statement to Court of Queen's Bench Justice Jim Eamon.

Baccari pulled out a handgun, according to the Crown.

Kerfont said, "what are you going to do, shoot me?" before Baccari pulled the trigger, according to Dalidowicz.

When emergency responders arrived, Kerfont was still conscious but complaining he couldn't breathe. He died at Foothills hospital.

In 2009, Baccari firebombed a home, injuring three members of a family. 

He smashed the glass balcony doors of a southeast home with a hammer and threw a Molotov cocktail inside.

Baccari was sentenced to seven years in prison following a trial.

In 2006, he beat a man who had been tied to a chair. The beating was so violent, it was described in court as "torture."

Baccari was sentenced to just over three years in prison for that crime. 

Baccari's current trial is set to last four weeks. It's expected defence lawyer Jim Lutz will focus his case on two issues: self-defence and intent.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Meghan Grant

CBC Calgary crime reporter

Meghan Grant is the courts and crime reporter for CBC Calgary. If you have a good story idea or tip, you can reach her at meghan.grant@cbc.ca or on Twitter at @CBCMeg.

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