Calgary

Calgary man convicted of teen's swarming murder gets bail pending Supreme Court appeal

One of the four men found guilty of killing Lukas Strasser-Hird has been granted an interim release from custody as the appeal of his conviction heads to the country's top court.

Lukas Strasser-Hird, 18, was beaten and stabbed to death outside a nightclub in 2013

Assmar Shlah, right, has been granted a judicial interim release from prison as he appeals his 2nd-degree murder conviction in the 2013 death of Lukas Strasser-Hird, left. (Facebook)

One of the four men found guilty of killing Lukas Strasser-Hird has been granted an interim release from custody as the appeal of his conviction heads to the country's top court.

Assmar Shlah was found guilty in 2016 of second-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison with no chance of parole for 12 years for his role in the killing of Strasser-Hird, who was swarmed and stabbed outside a Calgary nightclub in November 2013.

In May, Alberta's highest court dismissed his appeal.

However, because one of the three judges in that ruling dissented, Shlah was automatically allowed to take his appeal to the Supreme Court.

The judge who granted Shlah bail pending a hearing at the top court noted in her decision that Shlah is neither a flight risk, nor a threat to public safety, and that he has previously been out on bail without incident.

The Supreme Court is scheduled to hear Shlah's appeal in mid-November.

The lawyer for Franz Cabrera, who was also convicted of second-degree murder in the case, has said his client will also appeal to the Supreme Court.

In May, Nathan Gervais, 24, was found guilty of first-degree murder in Strasser-Hird's killing. He is asking the Alberta Court of Appeal to overturn his conviction.

Gervais had been set to go on trial with the other men in 2016 but fled the country. He was caught in Vietnam in 2018 and brought back to Canada to face a new trial this year.

Joch Pouk was found guilty of manslaughter in Strasser-Hird's death but did not appeal his conviction.

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