Calgary·Photos

How Albertans have celebrated marriage over the past 128 years

Look at how Alberta couples dressed and posed for one of the most memorable days of their lives, over the past 128 years.

Look at historic photos of what they wore for their weddings

The wedding party of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred E. Leary poses for a photo in Calgary in 1907. (Courtesy of Archives and Special Collections, University of Calgary)

This Valentine's Day, we've dug into the Glenbow Archives for a bit of a Flashback Friday on Albertan weddings.

While hairstyles and fabric cuts may have changed over the years, many of the core elements of this time-honoured expression of commitment and love have remained the same: two people, dressed to impress, flanked by loved ones and celebrating with food as they embark on a new adventure together.

Have a look for yourself. 

A bridal party in 1907

Dio and Maud Freeze in their wedding attire in Calgary on March 6, 1908. (Courtesy of Archives and Special Collections, University of Calgary)

Flying in the face of tradition in 1929

Mr. and Mrs. Doucet strike a rather unconventional wedding day pose in Edmonton in the summer of 1929. (Courtesy of Archives and Special Collections, University of Calgary)

Cutting the cake in 1954

Hazel Arlene Olsen and husband Erling H. Olsen slice into their wedding cake in June 1954. (Courtesy of Archives and Special Collections, University of Calgary)

A walk down the aisle in 1957

Shin Gam Len and Geem Sam Yuen walk down the aisle together on their wedding day in 1957 in Calgary. (Courtesy of Archives and Special Collections, University of Calgary)

Honouring cultural roots in 1973

Kunsang Sheka, Yanki Parcheng, Kalsang Drauo and Thubten Drauo appear in a photo of what the Glenbow Archives calls the first Tibetan wedding in Calgary, taken in 1973. (Courtesy of Archives and Special Collections, University of Calgary)

And the paperwork, even in 1892

The 1892 marriage certificate of John Ware, the first Black cowboy in Alberta and a great contributor to Alberta's ranching, agricultural and cattle industry, to Mildred Lewis. (Courtesy of Archives and Special Collections, University of Calgary)

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