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Albertans react to poll depicting them as 'aggrieved' and 'anxious'

Depression and anxiety are running deep in Alberta, according to a recent poll by the Angus Reid Institute in partnership with CBC News. Here's a look at the reaction to the numbers.

Calls to Distress Centre Calgary have increased

David Kirby is the clinical services manager for Distress Centre Calgary. He said he believes the recession is part of the reason behind an increase in Albertans calling the centre with relationship conflicts and issues with depression. (CBC)

Depression and anxiety are running deep in Alberta, according to a recent poll by the Angus Reid Institute in partnership with CBC News.

Roughly 59 per cent of Alberta respondents are pessimistic about the future of their province.

An increase of calls to the Distress Centre Calgary reflects this new reality, according to clinical services manager David Kirby.

"We hear from a lot of people about the conflict in relationships that's happening and a lot of depression as well," he said.

How Albertans feel about the way Ottawa treats them

6 years ago
Duration 0:55
Depression and anxiety are running deep in Alberta, according to a recent poll by the Angus Reid Institute in partnership with CBC News. Here's a look at the reaction to the numbers.

"People are really feeling down about what's happening and not certain about how this is going to change or when it's going to improve, or when is this next boom going to happen," Kirby added.

Survey respondents were asked if they agree with the following statements:

  • My province is treated fairly by the national government.
  • My province contributes more to the country than it gets back. 
  • My province is respected by the rest of the country.

Here's what else Albertans had to say about the results. 


86% of Albertans believe the province has contributed more to Canada than it gets in return 

"I think right now with the economy the way it is it's more of a sliding scale, that the rest of the country needs to make up some of the shortfall that Alberta's experiencing because of the under $50 a barrel of oil, and the loss of jobs here. So we're not a 'have-not' province but we're certainly not as 'have' a province as, historically, Alberta has been." — Bruce Noble 


Just 36% of Albertans feel their province is treated fairly by the federal government

"I think we're at the bottom of the totem pole. So I don't feel that we're a priority." — Kasia Richard

Kasia Richard says she thinks the new federal government has shifted its focus away from Western Canada. (CBC)

45% of Albertans feel the province is respected by the rest of the country

"It seems like that's appallingly low actually. I don't know that I feel particularly strongly about it either way. But my only response is that seems too low and if that's truly a reflection of how people in Alberta feel, then that's a concern I think." — Allissa Lau 

Allissa Lau says all levels of government need to work together. (CBC)

There's no sympathy, no empathy for what's going on. I would definitely say there's a lack of respect." — Whitney McKenzie


The Angus Reid Institute conducted an online survey Sept. 6-12 among a representative, randomized sample of 3,904 Canadian adults who are members of the Angus Reid Forum. The sample plan included large oversamples in certain cities and regions, including which were then weighted down to provide a national snapshot. For comparison purposes only, a probability sample of this size would carry a margin of error of plus or minus 2.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. 

A total of ​735 Albertans were surveyed as part of the national survey. A probability sample of this size would carry a margin of error of plus or minus four percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

With files from Raffy Boudjikanian, Carolyn Dunn and Monty Kruger

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