Calgary

Alberta economy a worry for upcoming university grads

Some Calgary post-secondary students preparing to enter the workforce are starting to worry about their job prospects.

Economist Todd Hirsch warns student unemployment rate expected to rise in first half of this year

Some experts say Alberta is heading into a recession, which is worrying university students preparing to enter the workforce. (Paul Sakuma/The Associated Press)

Some Calgary post-secondary students preparing to enter the workforce are starting to worry about their job prospects.

The economic downturn that many experts predict will hit Alberta in the wake of slumping oil prices could hit new grads especially hard, fears student Julian Nunez.

When the fourth-year petroleum engineering student isn’t studying, he’s on his laptop checking oil prices.

"It's demoralizing. It's very tough. It's a tough situation," he said.

When Nunez graduates in the spring he expects to be facing gloomy job prospects.

“There [aren’t] many posting for jobs and the ones that are open have thousands of people applying for them,” he said.

In a recent speech to Calgary a business audience, economist Todd Hirsch warned that the unemployment rate will rise during the first half of this year.

"I think 2015 is going to be a very challenging year for recent grads,” he said.

Fourth-year geophysics student Victor Hoang is planning to delay entering the workforce, and pursue a graduate degree instead.

"Hopefully if the master's takes two years, the economy will kick back and hopefully I'll find something then," he said.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now