Calgary

Alberta will spend $57M on new Court of Appeal building, incorporating century-old facility

Alberta will spend $57.3 million to build a new Court of Appeal in Calgary.

Court adjudicates 700 matters each year

Alberta's new Court of Appeal to incorporate historic building

1 year ago
Duration 4:01
The old Court of Appeal in Calgary is getting a $57-million facelift so it can once again adjudicate important cases. Take a walk through the building that hasn't been used since 2003 with Infrastructure Minister Prasad Panda.

Alberta will spend $57.3 million to build a new Court of Appeal in Calgary.

The current 107-year-old facility will be preserved, restored and incorporated into the new building.

Court of Appeal has operated out of leased space in TransCanada Tower and the Courts Centre since 2003, when the historic facility, located across the street from the Courts Centre at Seventh Avenue and Fifth Street S.W., was forced to close due to environmental issues like asbestos. 

Justice Minister Kaycee Madu said for a court that adjudicates 700 matters a year, the situation had become increasingly untenable.

"Some justices and staff desperately needed a functional, easily accessible facility, one in which they may perform their important work and adjudicate important cases as efficiently as possible without constantly having to shuttle back and forth between buildings," he said. 

The Court of Appeal building is the largest surviving courthouse from Alberta's first decade as a province, according to Canada's register of historic places, and the last major building in the city to be built with local sandstone. 

The project is expected to support about 570 construction jobs.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now