Calgary·Video

Why is Alberta looking to mine the Rockies for more coal? Here's a 4-minute explanation

You might have heard that Alberta recently rescinded a five-decade-old policy, opening the door for more open-pit coal mines in the Rockies and Foothills. What's it mean? We break it down in four minutes.

The province has ditched a Lougheed-era policy, reshaping a decades-old balance in the mountains

Alberta has reshaped a decades-old balance in the Rockies and Foothills, rescinding its 1976 Coal Development Policy, opening the door to more open-pit mines in the mountains. 4:03

You might have heard that Alberta recently rescinded its 1976 coal policy, opening the door for more open-pit coal mines in the Rockies and Foothills.

But what does that mean, exactly?

This video breaks it down. It gives you the basics, in four minutes.

If you want the more detailed version, check out our long-form story, here:

It outlines the history of Alberta's approach to coal development and why the province is now changing course and looking to emulate British Columbia by getting in on the lucrative — and volatile — export market for coal.

The full implications of this shift in direction are yet to be seen, but there is growing tension — both nervous and excited energy — about what it will bring.

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