Calgary·Blog

Calgary city council: 3 things to watch at today's meeting

Land use matters will rule this week's city council meeting. With 21 land use matters — including 11 secondary suite applications — some council veterans are already predicting it may take two or three days to complete this massive agenda.

CFB West development, parkade-free condos and secondary suites are all up for discussion

Land use matters will rule this week's city council meeting. W

ith 21 land use matters — including 11 secondary suite applications — some council veterans are already predicting it may take two or three days to complete this massive agenda.

Given the title of this blog, picking just three things to watch isn't easy!

CFB West lands

Council will be asked to approve amendments to the plan for the redevelopment of the former CFB land that is west of Crowchild Trail. More residences and higher densities are the wish — and the fancy drawings in the plan reflect it.

Indeed, with the number of towers projected and higher ones to boot, it almost looks like another Beltline emerging. Heritage military buildings and sites in the area will be preserved but everything else about this new plan looks like the higher density Calgary envisioned in the Municipal Development Plan is coming to fruition.

The CFB Master Plan calls for more residences and higher densities. (Canada Lands Company)

No car, no worries?

N3 is a condo development proposed in the East Village. Condos aren't new in this part of town but this block has a twist: no parking. Not digging out a parkade means lower costs per unit but also means condo buyers will rely on transit, taxis, Car2Go, a bike or their own two feet.

Given the location, just east of the St. Louis Hotel building on Eigth Avenue S.E., it's that much easier to go car-less. Council has to discuss the proposal because a land use amendment is required for this building to be parkade-free.

Making secondary suites legal — in some wards

The reluctance of some members of council with changing zoning across the board to make secondary suites legal anywhere in Calgary comes down to the look or feel of single family home communities changing.

But it's also to do with political risk if it's allowed to go ahead as some residents are adamantly opposed. So the city devised a new plan: allow secondary suites anywhere in four mostly inner-city wards where the area councillors fully support it — those who are willing to take the political risk.

What could stop this? How about councillors from other wards who don't want secondary suites legalized in Wards 7, 8, 9, and 11. You've heard the arguments before and we'll all certainly hear them again in this meeting.

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