Canada

Brother of Johnathan a 'smouldering volcano': psychiatrist

The Toronto teenager convicted of the brutal murder of his younger brother is a high risk to commit another violent offence, a forensic psychiatrist testified Tuesday.

The Toronto teenager convicted of the brutal murder of his younger brother is a high risk to commit another violent offence, a forensic psychiatrist testified Tuesday.

Dr. Ian Swayzetold theSuperior Courthebelievedthe 19-year-old is "a smouldering volcano with steam coming out of the vents."

The teenwas one of three people charged after his brother — who has become known as "Johnathan" to the public — was killed in an attack in his east Toronto home in November 2003.

The 12-year-old boy was beaten with baseball bats, stabbed 71 times and had his throat cut.

In February, his older brother was found guilty of first-degree murder, and guilty of attempted murder for attacking his stepfather when the45-year-old man arrived at the home.

Another teen was found guilty of manslaughter, while a third was acquitted.

None can beidentified under terms of the Youth Criminal Justice Act.

The current hearing is concerningwhether the two convicted teens will be sentenced as youths or adults.

Justice David McCombs has promised sentencing will occur within the week.

Swayze, who met twice with the older brother, once in April and again in August, said he qualifies as a "psychopath."

He said the boy displayed an obsession with knives and fire and a record of violence that predated the killing.

One incident occurred in 2002, when the boy, then 15, was charged with threatening to blow up his school and with making death threats towards fellow students.His teachers called him a "time bomb."

Swayze said the convicted murderer shows no remorse for his brother's killing and even refused to use his brother's name when the doctor brought up the topic during one of their meetings.

"He turned it into a thing," Swayze said. "A cold, distant event."

Swayze also talked about the teen's propensity for anger, even quoting him in one report as saying, "I often have a lot of anger. Most people piss me off."

Testimony ended Tuesday with Swayze's brief recommendation to the court.

"[He] poses a high risk for violent recidivism," he said.

"In my opinion, he requires a multitude of therapeutic interventions in a structured setting; under detention and close supervision."

The convictions in February cameafter a second trial.

The first ended in mistrial when it was discovered that a key witness, a teenage girl, had given testimony that contradicted extensive postings she had made on a website.

With files from Canadian Press