British Columbia

B.C. introduces temporary outdoor job program for youth up to age 29

B.C. has introduced a program aimed at creating community service work for 15- to 29-year-olds, while their job prospects are dramatically affected by COVID-19.

Youth would receive a training stipend for work until October to a maximum of $8K

Almost 25 per cent of youth are unemployed in B.C., says Advanced Education Minister Melanie Mark. (Ben Nelms/CBC)

B.C. has introduced a program aimed at creating community service work for 15- to 29-year-olds, while their job prospects are dramatically affected by COVID-19.

Advanced Education Minister Melanie Mark said Monday that almost 25 per cent of youth are unemployed in B.C. and the program would give them an opportunity to work outdoors on initiatives such as building trails or cleaning beaches.

The $5-million program will provide up to $10,000 in grants for community projects lasting up to 16 weeks, Mark said.

The money is part of a labour market development agreement with the federal government, which provided provinces and territories with funding in 2018.

British Columbia received $685 million over six years, the Advanced Education Ministry said.

The Youth Community Partnership Program introduced Monday would give youth a training stipend of up to $2,000 per four-week period, to a maximum of $8,000 for work until the end of October.

"There's been a lot of uncertainty out there,'' Mark said, adding physical distancing requirements mean a limit of 10 youth will be part of each project.

Participants may also receive supports such as bus passes, child care, work boots and personal protective equipment.

Minister of Social Development and Poverty Reduction Shane Simpson said the program would provide young people with responsibility and work experience as B.C. begins to recover from the pandemic.

"We know the challenge of jobs is very real and we know that youth employment and youth unemployment is very much a challenge moving forward,'' Simpson said as he urged community groups to get their applications in quickly to benefit youth who could work during the summer.

Mark says the program gives youth a training stipend of up to $2,000 per four-week period. (Ben Nelms/CBC)

Chief Councillor Robert J. Dennis Sr. of the Huu-ay-aht First Nations said students face an uncertain future and participating in the program would give them skills they could take into their future careers.

Dennis said his community in Port Alberni could benefit from projects related to the environment in the area that currently has a fishery renewal initiative underway.

"This would certainly be a good time to introduce the youth to why fishery renewal is really important to the nation. Forestry renewal is another thing,'' he said.

Tanysha Klassen, chairperson of the B.C. Federation of Students, says some students who haven't been able to secure summer jobs to pay for tuition in the upcoming year have planned to not return to school in the fall because of financial instability.

Klassen said the provincial program can fill out some of the gaps left by the federal student program — a volunteer service grant of up to $5,000 announced on Friday.

 

With files from All Points West

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