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Which type of Canadian are you? Answer these questions to find out

There isn't one defined set of Canadian values — but there may be five. That's the conclusion of the Angus Reid Institute, after polling thousands of Canadians in a joint partnership with the CBC on their beliefs, values and identities.

Analysis by Angus Reid Institute says most people fall into 1 of 5 categories

There isn't one defined set of Canadian values — but there may be five., according to a CBC-Angus Reid poll 1:26

There isn't one defined set of Canadian values — but there may be five. 

That's the conclusion of the Angus Reid Institute, after polling thousands of Canadians in a joint partnership with the CBC on their beliefs, values and identities. 

"The notion that there are a common set of Canadian values, it's far more complex than that. It's a much more complicated and complex equation," said Shachi Kurl, executive director of the Angus Reid Institute.

"Although we are united by a number of things, there are also some vast differences and cleavages in how we think depending on where we live, who we are, what our background is, what our experiences have been." 

On LGBT and Indigenous rights, the importance of religion and home ownership, health care, the environment and many other public policy issues, Canadians surveyed were divided in their opinions. 

However, the institute analyzed the data and found responders tended to cluster into five groups, which it describes in the following way:

Which one are you? Take the quiz to find out

Permissive reformers 

(Philip Street/CBC)

Tending to be younger, university educated and living in cities, members of this group believe strongly in favour of more government support for Indigenous people and greater acceptance of the LGBT community. They are much more likely to believe Canada should encourage cultural diversity. 

Public sector proponents 

(Philip Street/CBC)

Demographically, this group has the highest concentration of women (60 per cent) and people in the middle of the political spectrum (48 per cent). Its members have a high degree of trust in the media and government, support affirmative action for women in the workplace and favour more government regulation in the economy. 

Cautious skeptics 

(Philip Street/CBC)

While this group tends to be split down the middle on policy positions and gender, its members tend not to trust the media or the government to act in their best interest. They tend to believe both media and the government have inflated the threat of terrorism. 

Faith-based traditionalists 

(Philip Street/CBC)

The most religious group by far, 83 per cent of this cohort say we should publicly celebrate the role of faith in Canadian lives. They tend to be against doctor-assisted dying and greater acceptance of the LGBT community. This group also has the largest number of rural Canadians and immigrants. 

Free enterprise enthusiasts 

(Philip Street/CBC)

Two-thirds of people in this group are male, half are over 55 years old and a quarter have a household income over $100,000. They tend to believe in less government regulation in the economy, oppose regulations that would create gender parity in large public companies and think the social safety net should be cut back.

Different mindsets

The polling "really helps us understand some of the mindsets that show the differences of where Canadians are on some of these values and their sense of identity," says Kurl. 

"It shows how Canadians' views shake out on some of these less-agreed-upon values."

But which one are you? You can take the quiz here. 

(Natalie Holdway/CBC)