British Columbia

War Junk TV show connects family to uncle who died in WWII

Wayne Abbott travels to deserted battlefields looking for lost objects that will bring to life the memories of those who died in battle with their relatives around the world.

'He died doing what he wanted and that made us feel better,' said Lynda Roberts

Hugh Iver Parry's ID bracelet was found by War Junk directors and was used to connect them to his nieces. (War Junk)

Wayne Abbott's detective work lead to Lynda Roberts re-connecting with her past. 

Abbott travels to deserted battlefields looking for lost objects that will bring to life the memories of those who died in battle with their relatives around the world.

He found an ID bracelet belonging to Roberts' uncle, Hugh Iver Parry — with the words 'From Mom and Dad' engraved on the back. 

"It just made everything more known to us," said Roberts.

"We didn't really know anything other than he had died in the battle of Normandy."

Abbott, who produces a TV show called War Junk, flew out Roberts and her sister out to Normandy to see the artifacts for themselves and learn about their uncle. 

"We were thinking how sad it was," she said of Parry who died at the age of 22 while working as a radio operator.

Lynda Roberts (left) and her sister Donna Bolton hold the ID bracelet of their uncle Hugh Iver Parry found south of Juno Beach (War Junk)

"But he died doing what he wanted to do and that made us feel better."

For the producers of the show it also hits home. 

"None of these artifacts are easy to solve but it was wonderful to tie everything up for them," said Abbott. 

War Junk's Juno Beach episode airs on November 8 on History Channel. 


To hear the full interview listen to the audio labelled War Junk TV show connects family to uncle who died in WWII on CBC's The Early Edition.

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