British Columbia

Wagstaffe's Weather: A little less January for June 15th

Watch for lingering showers to start Wednesday before afternoon sunny breaks return.

Morning showers, afternoon sun for the South Coast

While not as January-like over the next few days - we really won't see Summer weather again until the weekend. (Johanna Wagstaffe/CBC)

Remember when in one day, the South Coast got everything from rain and hail, to snow and thunderstorms; not to mention a bit of blue sky and a waterspout watch to boot? That was yesterday.

Wednesday's weather will be much improved, although you'll have to get through lingering showers and low cloud to start the day.

And there is still a chance of some high elevation snow again through the morning hours. 

Temperatures should get up to 16 C or 17 C for Vancouver — a few degrees warmer than the 14 C we struggled to reach on Tuesday.

By Wednesday afternoon, our stormy low pressure system splits in two. That will leave Vancouver sitting in between the unsettled systems, meaning we won't get the worst of it but we are not out of the woods as far as a stray shower.

While temperatures will steadily climb each day until early next week when we get back into the mid 20s — it's not until Sunday that we can say good riddance, or a sad farewell, to the Fall-like weather.

A cold low pressure system was the culprit behind the active weather these past few days. (Johanna Wagstaffe/CBC)
The low pressure system splits in two from Wednesday through Friday leading to improved weather, but not quite full-on Summer weather. In between weather you could say. (Johanna Wagstaffe/CBC)
By Sunday, the low pressure systems will finally exit stage right, allowing warmer Pacific air to move in just in time for the second half of the weekend. (Johanna Wagstaffe/CBC)

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Johanna Wagstaffe

Senior Meteorologist

Johanna Wagstaffe is a senior meteorologist for CBC, covering weather and science stories, with a background in seismology and earth science. Her weekly segment, Science Smart, answers viewers' science-related questions.

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