British Columbia

Councillor wants Vancouver to realize the full potential of its 'night' economy

Coun. Lisa Dominato is putting forward a motion to enhance entertainment, leisure and social activities for all ages after 5 p.m. as well as providing better transportation and safety for the city's nighttime workforce.

Better transit, lighting, entertainment options for all ages wrapped into new motion

Improving Vancouver's nighttime economy would also include safe transportation, says Coun. Lisa Dominato. (Roshini Nair/CBC)

A Vancouver city councillor wants her new motion to unlock the potential of Vancouver's nighttime economy. 

Coun. Lisa Dominato says cities around the world have started paying attention to their nighttime economies — which include sectors like dining, entertainment, music, concerts and related economic factors including transportation and food and drink costs. 

"There [are] lots of things that can be activated after five o'clock, and contribute in a positive way both to the local economy in terms of jobs ... but also to the vibrancy of our city in terms of arts and culture hospitality," Dominato said.

She says her four-page motion brings together work the city has already done on liquor policy, music strategy and its creative city strategy to create a stronger focus on the night economy. 

The strategy would extend beyond the patrons of Vancouver's traditional bar scene to young families, children and youth, and students. 

"It also includes nighttime workers," she said. "We've got people working in sectors like health care, policing, first responders as well that are part of our nighttime economy ... so after five o'clock you have to think about things like public transportation, public safety, accessibility and what are all the different wraparound pieces that might be basic things like lighting, washrooms." 

Dominato's motion goes before council on May 28.

With files from Justin McElroy

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