British Columbia

Vancouver Conservative candidate in legal fight with family

Court documents reveal Vancouver South Conservative candidate Wai Young is involved in a bitter legal dispute with her siblings over their father's estate.
Vancouver South Conservative Party candidate Wai Young's campaign has been in the spotlight. (CBC)

Court documents reveal Vancouver South Conservative candidate Wai Young is involved in a bitter legal dispute with her siblings over their father's estate.       

The documents, which were filed in 2009, show Wai Young's sister, Wai Ling Eng, went to small claims court to recover $14,000 from her sister.

Wai Ling Eng claimed her sister, the Conservative candidate, was loaned the money by their father. After his death in 2008, Wai Ling Eng filed a claim she was the executor of their father's will and that Wai Young should pay the money back.

But Wai Young filed documents claiming the money was a gift, to help her buy a second home in Ottawa. A further search shows a dispute between other siblings in the family over her father's estate.

A newspaper report published on Tuesday quoted Wai Ling Eng as saying the family is so divided that five of seven siblings won't vote for Wai Young in the upcoming election.

The CBC has yet to reach either sister for comment.

Young is expected to be a strong challenger in Vancouver South after losing to Ujjal Dosanjh by just 20 votes in 2008.     

Over the weekend her campaign ran into controversy when it was revealed she had accepted an endorsement from Ripudaman Singh Malik, a local Sikh businessman linked to individuals convicted in the Air India bombings.