British Columbia

Unicyclist Ryan Kremsater rolls on to the set of CBC News Vancouver

Unicyclist pushes himself with the challenge of one-wheel riding on mountains trails in B.C.

Unicyclist takes recreation on one-wheel, pedal strokes further

Mountain unicycler Ryan Kremsater rolls on to the set of CBC News Vancouver. 0:24

If you've ever been to the North Shore mountains, you've seen how extreme mountain bike trails can get. 

But, when mountain unicycler Ryan Kremsater rolled on to the set of CBC News Vancouver with Andrew Chang on Friday, he showed everyone the next level of extreme.

Kremsater rides the mountains regularly on a single, 26-inch wheel — much larger than a traditional unicycle at 20 inches. The frame is made of aluminum which keeps it light and manoeuvrable.

An excerpt from Mountain unicycler Ryan Kremsater's video "A North Shore Shred". He goes for a "typical" one-wheeled ride on two trails in Vancouver's North Shore. 0:45

The unicyclist said the sport is simply good fun and says he loves that every ride pushes him further.

"That's the main reason why I think anyone does anything it's the challenge."

He also finds that unicycling gives him space to focus and be present in what he's doing. It's a sport where attention to detail is key and every move matters.

"There's not much room to let your mind wander because any small obstacle can take you down — even small rocks — if you're not paying attention." 

Despite how shocking Kremsater's videos are and the obvious difficulty of unicycling, he maintains the sport isn't as dangerous as it seems.

"It's pretty safe. I've never had any serious injuries." 

Kremsater is sponsored by one of the the pioneers of the sport, Kris Holm, another Vancouverite.

Holm has won multiple world championships in unicycling and held the world record for unicycle high jump for six years.

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