British Columbia·In Depth

Parole documents: high risk UBC suspect assaulted women after release

A high risk offender being investigated for links to an attempted home invasion and attacks at UBC was caught assaulting women at transit stations after his release from jail. Jason Anthony White was under long term supervision at the time, but Crown counsel did not press breach charges which might have sent him back to jail.

Crown declined to press breach charges that might have sent Jason Anthony White back to jail

Jason Anthony White, also known as Jason Eugene Rindero, was convicted of assaulting women in transit stations in 2014. (Vancouver Police Department)

A high risk offender under investigation for links to an attempted home invasion and attacks at UBC was caught assaulting women at transit stations after his release from jail.

Jason Anthony White was under long term supervision at the time, in the summer of 2014. 

But despite a recommendation from the parole board, the Crown did not press breach charges which might have sent him back to jail.

Instead, according to parole board documents obtained by the CBC, White — who was born Jason Eugene Rindero — was convicted of assault, given a one-day sentence, fined $200 and re-released to the community.

Caught on UBC grounds

The 45-year-old was captured on the UBC campus early Saturday morning after a manhunt which began with an attempted home invasion in Oakridge, in which an 86-year-old woman suffered a broken hand.

His history of sexual assaults against much older women made him a suspect in that case. But given the fact White was caught on university grounds, police are also looking at his possible involvement in a sexual assault and a series of prowling incidents which have resulted serious safety concerns for students.

A photo of the suspect in an alleged home invasion attempt in which Jason Anthony White is a suspect. (Vancouver Police)

White's parole history reveals the troubling history of a man deemed at "risk for sexual offending against vulnerable members of society" as recently as this February, when the board ordered him to continue living under strict supervision at a community residential facility or community correctional centre for another year.

In 1999, White was declared a dangerous offender and given an indeterminate sentence for sexually assaulting and terrorizing a 74-year-old woman.

But he successfully appealed the designation and was handed an eight-year prison term in 2005 followed by 10 years of long-term supervision.

If an offender breaches the terms of their supervision, they will be detained until the board meets to consider the terms of the supervision order.

But unlike parole, they won't be returned to jail permanently unless they are convicted of breaching supervision under the criminal code.

Assaults in transit stations 

After his release into a community facility in 2013, parole records show White breached his supervision several times. He assaulted a co-worker and was also caught drinking.

But by far the most alarming incidents occurred in June and July of 2014 when police told staff at the facility where White was living that he was being investigated in relation to three separate assaults against women.

Jason Anthony White assaulted women who he followed on escalators in transit stations. (CBC)

"The assaults occurred in transit stations. The assaults were videotaped and depicted you following the victims on an escalator. When the victims got off the escalator, they had a white substance on their backs that was not there when they got on the escalator," the parole board document reads.

"When one of the victims confronted you a tube was observed in your hands, which you claimed was hand lotion. Police indicated they suspect the white substance was possibly semen."

In September 2014, the parole board concluded White was engaging "sexually deviant behaviour towards the female victims" and recommended the laying of a breach charge which would have seen him go to jail for up to 10 years if convicted. But none was filed.

A Crown spokesman did not speak to the specifics of the case, but cited as a possible reason the threshold for the laying of charges, which is a substantial likelihood of conviction.

The parole documents say the Crown supported the assault charges for the incidents involving the three women.

White's most recent psychological risk assessment found him a "high risk for general, violent and sexual reoffending."

He has a violent criminal history dating back 30 years, including numerous attacks on women.

"The Board asked you why you seemed to target older women and you, somewhat reluctantly, admitted they were more vulnerable," one report reads. 

About the Author

Jason Proctor

@proctor_jason

Jason Proctor is a reporter in British Columbia for CBC News and has covered the B.C. courts and mental health issues in the justice system extensively.

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