British Columbia

Union representing Metro Vancouver's striking transit workers back at the bargaining table

Contract talks between the union representing Metro Vancouver transit workers and the Coast Mountain Bus Company resumed Wednesday as region-wide job action entered its 13th day.

10 more SeaBus sailings cancelled and buses delayed Wednesday as bargaining resumes

Gavin McGarrigle of Unifor, pictured at a news conference in New Westminster, B.C., on Nov. 12, said all drivers will refuse overtime Friday if an agreement can't be reached. (Ben Nelms/CBC)

The union representing Metro Vancouver transit workers is heading back to the bargaining table as region-wide job action enters its 13th day.

Unifor lead negotiator Gavin McGarrigle said Tuesday the union had asked the employer, Coast Mountain Bus Company, to resume negotiations Wednesday. The meeting will be the first between the two sides since talks broke off on Oct. 31.

McGarrigle also announced that all drivers will refuse overtime Friday if an agreement can't be reached, affecting 10 to 15 per cent of Metro Vancouver's bus service.

He said the overtime ban for drivers will only take effect on Friday, for now, but he added that action would expand if a deal isn't reached.

Dozens of bus routes experienced delays during the Wednesday morning rush hour, as has been the case since the job action started.

An overtime ban by maintenance workers began Nov. 1 and has also caused more than 100 cancellations on the SeaBus, which connects Vancouver and North Vancouver.

Ten more SeaBus sailings have been cancelled on Wednesday afternoon and evening:

  • The 4:10 p.m., 5 p.m., 6 p.m., 7:32 p.m., and 8:47 p.m. sailings from Lonsdale Quay.
  • The 4:25 p.m., 5:15 p.m., 6:15 p.m., 7:46 p.m., and 9:01 p.m. sailings from Waterfront.

Six SeaBus sailings have been cancelled for Thursday afternoon and evening:

  • The 4:10 p.m., 7:32 p.m., and 8:47 p.m. sailings from Lonsdale Quay.
  • The 4:25 p.m., 7:46 p.m., and 9:01 p.m. sailings from Waterfront.

Unifor, which represents 5,000 transit workers in the region, is seeking better wages, benefits and working conditions.

With files from CBC News

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