British Columbia·TOP STORIES 2014

Transgender policy for Vancouver schools draws fire

The Vancouver School Board came under fire from parents and some trustees in May and June for a new policy supporting transgender students.

Support for transgender students comes under fire from some trustees who fear property values will fall

Two students embrace after the Vancouver School Board approved a policy to provide more support to transgender students in June. (CBC)

From protest lines to picket lines to hockey lines, it has been another fascinating year in the news in B.C.

We want to know: which story mattered most to you?

Click on the link below to see our complete list, then vote.

Vote now for B.C.'s Top Story of 2014


The Vancouver School Board came under fire from parents and some trustees in May and June for a new policy supporting transgender students.

The new guidelines allowed transgender students to be addressed by the name that corresponds with their own gender identity, and to use the washroom of their choice.

The move didn't sit well with some parents, who accused the school board of pushing the policy through without consulting them first.

"It is inappropriate for teachers to be writing up a policy without having approval by the B.C. College of Physicians and College of Psychologists," said Cheryl Chang, chair of the Parent Advisory Council for Lord Byng Secondary School.

Vancouver school trustees Ken Denike and Sophia Woo were expelled from the NPA over their opposition to the VSB's transgender policy. (CBC)

School trustees Sophia Woo and Ken Denike also opposed the policy change, saying it could affect enrolment in public schools and real estate values on the city's West Side.

The pair were expelled from the Non Partisan Association caucus for their stance, and ultimately lost their bid to sit as independents on the school board in the fall civic elections.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.