TOPIC: FROM THE CBC B.C. ARCHIVES

When Planes, Trains and Automobiles reached the cinema

Midday's Tom New reviews a 1987 comedy from director John Hughes about the stress of travelling to get home for U.S. Thanksgiving.

25 years after Judi Tyabji case, some advances for politicians balancing motherhood and work

Tyabji says it was clear to her at the time that the decision discriminated against her as a woman working in a non-traditional, predominantly male role. But family lawyer Leena Yusefi says she's not surprised the judge didn't grant her custody at the time.

30 years after Canada's first MP came out, LGBT politicians still face challenges

Today, there are LGBT elected officials across the country. They say it’s because of Robinson and others like him that they’re able to live a life without fear. But they also say they continue to face hatred and threats, and there is still work for them to do.

Fighting for fairness: 43 years of B.C. real estate assessments

As depicted in archived videos found in the CBC vault, anger over how properties are assessed forms a long-standing grievance in B.C.
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From cocktail pumps to pagers: Ye olde tech gifts of yore

Judging by CBC's archives, gifting electronic consumer goods has long been popular, starting from when people first figured out how to operate a battery-powered motor.
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'You can't be what you can't see': 25 years later, female firefighters still few among men

Firefighters say a lot has changed since women joined their ranks. But they also say more needs to be done so other women can see themselves in the profession.
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Revered and reviled: The Gastown steam clock turns 40

Will Woods is a conflicted man. On the one hand, the tour operator feels compelled to include Gastown's iconic steam clock as part of the daily walking tours he offers. But then comes the part when he has to clarify that the clock was actually built in 1977.
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'It was like one big family': 25 years later, a B.C. ghost town's former residents still miss their home

Twenty-five years ago this week Cassiar, B.C., held an auction like none other: up for grabs was the entire contents of the now-defunct company town.
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That time a garbage strike nearly shut down X-files filming in Vancouver

It was September 1997 and a civic strike had caused mounds of stinky, rotting garbage to pile up throughout Vancouver.
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'There was just lots of neon spandex': A look back at the aerobics craze of the late '80s

There was the music. There was the hair. And then there were the outfits.
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'Still the same park, still the same feeling': 40 years of the Vancouver folk festival

The first festival took place in a muddy field in Stanley Park. This weekend, about 50,000 people are expected to show up at Jericho Beach to for the 40th festival.
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From illegal to Olympic sport: Skateboarding in Vancouver through the ages

Skateboarding's ascent to the Summer Olympic Games in 2020 may have finally established it as a legitimate sport, but it's had a plentiful share of trials of tribulations.
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'Every kid and their dog' had to have one: The Tamagotchi craze of the '90s

"If kids didn't have it in their pockets, parents were basically babysitting them."
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'It was disastrous': The Burrard Bridge bike lane experiment of 1996

Separated bike lanes are a growing commodity in Vancouver, despite their ongoing contentious relationship with drivers — but when the city tried out its first one 21 years ago, the reaction was not promising.
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FROM THE ARCHIVES

'We used to laugh every day': 20 years after leaving CBC, Vicki Gabereau still misses it

When Vicki Gabereau wrapped the last episode of her self-titled CBC Radio show 20 years ago, she knew she was leaving something special behind.
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'He botched it': how Vander Zalm's labour laws led to one of B.C.'s largest general strikes

Thirty years ago, nearly 300,000 workers across British Columbia walked off the job as part of a general strike against new labour legislation. It was a sweeping show of protest one expert says is unlikely to ever happen again.
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'Every once in awhile you would get a mud shark in the pool': Vancouver's outdoor pools, then and now

Vancouver's outdoor pools open for the summer season this weekend, continuing a decades-long tradition of aquatic leisure in the city.
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A look back at the birth of the B.C. Green Party

The B.C. Greens have been in place for 34 years now, yet many of the initial criticisms remain. But many agree the party has also changed and evolved.
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How the B.C. election of '96 changed provincial politics

It was a tight election that included a singing candidate, plenty of scandal, and a narrow victory. Such was the B.C. election of 1996, the last time the provincial NDP were elected to power.
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When teaching teenagers about AIDS was a really big deal

Sex education in B.C. starts as early as kindergarten, so it can be difficult to imagine how controversial it once was to teach Grade 12 students about preventing AIDS.
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A look back at the beginning of the B.C. Liberal reign

It was one of the biggest political upsets in provincial history, and the party that won is still in place 16 years later — albeit with a different leader.
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That time Vancouver's hippies took over Stanley Park 50 years ago

Carol Reid was 23 years old when she donned a garland of iris flowers and walked out the door of her Fourth Avenue home to join hundreds of hippies making their way to Stanley Park.
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Decades before Vancouver Aquarium debate, zoo faced similar controversies

The Vancouver Zoo in Stanley Park officially closed in 1997 with the death of its last polar bear, Tuk. Then, as now, people hotly debated keeping mammals in captivity.
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20 years ago, B.C. scientists warned of provincial impact of climate change

In an age of freak storms, extreme heat and flooding, it can be difficult to remember a time when climate change wasn't a subject most people were familiar with.
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30 years ago condoms were first sold in B.C. convenience stores — and people were shocked

Flavoured, coloured, textured — condoms in their various forms are fairly ubiquitous these days. But in the late 80s, their availability was mostly limited to pharmacies and doctor's offices.

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