British Columbia

Stolen bicycles worth $100K recovered by Vancouver police

VPD hoping to reunite 148 bikes, e-bikes and scooters with their rightful owners after discovered the stolen goods in multiple storage lockers.

Storage lockers full of 148 stolen bikes, e-bikes and scooters discovered during an unrelated investigation

Vancouver police show off the 148 stolen bikes, e-bike and scooters valued at more than $100,000 that were recovered from multiple storage units. (Ben Nelms/CBC)

Vancouver's bike theft epidemic was on sharp display Wednesday, as Vancouver police showed off 148 stolen bicycles, scooters and electric bikes recovered from a number of eastside storage lockers late last month.

The estimated value of the bikes is over $100,000.

VPD Sgt. Aaron Roed said police are now working to find the rightful owners, something that isn't always easy.

"Often, when we are dealing with reports of stolen bikes, we find that owners are unable to provide serial numbers or other identifying descriptions that could help us get their bike back to them," said Roed.

Sgt. Aaron Roed said over 1,600 bikes have been stolen in Vancouver since the beginning of the year. (Ben Nelms/CBC)

He said registering a bike using the serial numbers and free 529 Garage registration and recovery program is the best way to help police reunite a stolen bike with its rightful owner.

Police were led to the storage lockers during an unrelated investigation.

Since the beginning of the year, more than 1,600 bicycles have been reported stolen in Vancouver.

Anyone who has not reported their bike stolen to VPD can do so using the online crime reporting system or by calling the non-emergency police line.   

Three Vancouver men and another from Surrey were arrested and released without charges. VPD say they continue to investigate and may recommend charges in the future.

Vancouver police say people who haven't reported their bike stolen should contact them using the online crime reporting system or through the non-emergency line. (Ben Nelms/CBC)

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