British Columbia

Sikh motorcycle club organizes memorial to show support for Tk'emlúps te Secwepemc community

A group of motorcyclists is showing their support for the Tk'emlúps te Secwepemc community after the preliminary discovery of 215 children's remains at a former residential school in Kamloops, B.C.

The Lost Souls Memorial was organized at site of former residential school in Kamloops

Dozens of riders from the Sikh Motorcycle Club in B.C. arrived in Kamloops on Sunday, June 20 to show their support for the Tk’emlúps te Secwepemc community. Kamloops Indian Band Chief Rosanne Casimir (middle), says the support has meant a lot. (Jenifer Norwell/CBC)

A group of motorcyclists is showing their support for the Tk'emlúps te Secwepemc community after the preliminary discovery of 215 children's remains at a former residential school in Kamloops, B.C.

On Sunday, members of the Sikh Motorcycle Club organized the Lost Souls Memorial and arrived from the Lower Mainland, proudly wearing orange.

"Our faith, our gurus have always taught us that we should help one another and especially the ones in need," Sikh Motorcycle Club member Pav Gill said on CBC's Daybreak Kamloops.

This is the second time the group has organized a memorial for children who died.

"We decided to come here and express our grief and share their grief," Sikh Motorcycle Club founder Harjinder Thind said.

"We are expecting that these kind of unions of ethnic minorities and the strength that Indigenous people are gaining will help us in increasing the awareness and also obtaining justice."

Members of the Sikh Motorcycle Club arrived at the former residential school in Kamloops proudly wearing orange on Sunday. (Jenifer Norwell/CBC)

Kamloops Indian Band Chief Rosanne Casimir said the gesture means a lot.

"It means so much because they are sharing a lot of the same atrocities that we've had when it comes to racism and discrimination," she said.

With files from Daybreak Kamloops

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