British Columbia

B.C., Ontario ridings lead record advance poll turn-out

Despite long lines and delays, several ridings in B.C. and Ontario led the country for the number of votes cast at advance polls over the Thanksgiving weekend.

About half an million B.C. residents cast their ballots at the advanced polls

Advance polls open at River Oaks Recreational Centre in Oakville, Ont. on Oct. 11. (Michelle-Andrea Girouard/CBC)

Despite the long lines and delays, several ridings in B.C. and Ontario led the country for the number of votes cast at advance polls over the Thanksgiving weekend.

A record number 3.6 million voters across Canada turned out to vote at the advanced poll — a 71 per cent  increase from the 2.1 million who voted in advance in the 2011 general election, according to Elections Canada.

Across Canada the ridings with the highest turnout included:

  • Ottawa Centre with 18,751 votes cast.
  • Orléans with 18,741.
  • Victoria, with 17,501.
  • Esquimalt-Saanich-Sooke with 16,358.
  • Simcoe–Grey with 16,318
  • Saanich-Gulf Islands with 16,236.
  • North Okanagan-Shuswap with 16,213.
  • West Vancouver-Sunshine Coast-Sea to Sky Country with 16,108.

With analysts predicting that the final outcome of the closely fought three-way race won't be decided until the results from B.C.'s 42 ridings are counted, interest in the election in B.C. appears to be peaking.

About half a million B.C. residents cast their ballots at the advanced polls, according to figures released by Elections Canada on Wednesday, a 95 per cent increase over 2011.

Recent poll results show the Liberals narrowly lead in B.C. with 31 per cent, followed by the Conservatives at 28.7 per cent and the New Democrats at 28 per cent. The Greens have averaged 10.7 per cent in recent polls.

Many candidates and third party campaigners were also busy over the long weekend calling voters on their lists and urging them to vote at the advanced polls, resulting in unexpectedly long lines, delays, ballot shortages, and angry confrontations at many polling stations and Elections Canada offices.

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