British Columbia

More than half of British Columbians want 30 km/h residential speed limits, poll says

More than half of the British Columbians surveyed in a new poll say they want to see speed limits lowered on residential streets, and many report regularly seeing cars speeding in their neighbourhoods.

42 per cent of those polled say they've seen a car speeding in their neighbourhood at least once a day

A pilot project to reduce speed limits to 30 km/h on select roads in Vancouver was approved earlier this year. (Clare Hennig/CBC)

More than half of the British Columbians surveyed in a new poll say they want speed limits lowered on residential streets, and many report regularly seeing cars speeding in their neighbourhoods.  

Earlier this year, Vancouver City Council  passed a motion to reduce the speed limit to 30 km/h on some streets as part of a pilot project to make the roads safer for pedestrians and cyclists.

Fifty-eight per cent of those who responded in the survey conducted by Research Co. said they would "definitely" or "probably" like to see the speed limits reduced in their own municipality, while the speed limit on arterial and collector roads would stay at 50 km/h.

The survey polled polled 800 British Columbians in late May and looked at gender, age, region of residence and political allegiance. A probability sample of the same size would yield a margin of error of plus or minus 3.5 per cent.

"While many British Columbians are in favour of the City of Vancouver's pilot project, there are some differences related to political allegiance," said Mario Canseco, president of the polling company, in a release.

People on Vancouver Island and Metro Vancouver were less likely to see speeding cars in their neighbourhoods compared to areas like the Fraser Valley, northern B.C. and southern B.C., according to the poll. (Tina Lovgreen/CBC)

"British Columbians who voted for the B.C. New Democratic Party and the B.C. Green Party in the last provincial election are more supportive of the project; 74 per cent and 72 per cent respectively, than those who voted for the B.C. Liberals in 2017 [at] 60 per cent."

A significant number of residents reported in the survey that they regularly see a car that appears to be speeding above the current 50 km/h limit: 42 per cent of respondents say this happens at least once a day and 27 per cent estimate it happens a few times a week.

The city's pilot project reducing speed limits on some streets is expected to start in September.  

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