British Columbia

RCMP say traffic stops by suspected police impersonator were done by on-duty officer

B.C. RCMP have confirmed that traffic stops previously believed to have been conducted by a police impersonator were, in fact, done by an on-duty provincial traffic enforcement officer.

Officer was on-duty and dressed in a full uniform but in an unmarked vehicle

The officer was with the B.C. RCMP North Okanagan Traffic Services, a roving traffic enforcement unit based in Falkland. (James Morrison-Collalto/CBC)

B.C. RCMP have confirmed that traffic stops on rural North Okanagan roads previously believed to have been conducted by a police impersonator were, in fact, done by an on-duty provincial traffic enforcement officer.

On March 21 police issued a notice to the public, warning of a person impersonating a police officer and conducting traffic stops outside of Lumby, a community east of Vernon.

Four other motorists came forward reporting similar incidents.

But on Wednesday police said a review into the incidents showed they were done by a legitimate police officer who was on-duty, dressed in full uniform and operating a fully equipped unmarked white Chevrolet Tahoe.

The officer was with the B.C. RCMP North Okanagan Traffic Services, a roving traffic enforcement unit based in the southern Interior community of Falkland. 

"A complete review of the traffic enforcement officer's electronic database police records, combined with in-car video system footage has provided confirmation that the four reported traffic stops in the Lumby area in mid-March were conducted by the highway patrol officer," said Insp. Jeff Dowling of B.C. RCMP Traffic Services in the Southeast District in written statement.

"We have since updated our four civilian complainants from the Lumby area of the investigative findings to date. We wish to thank each of them for coming forward with their information, in order to aid in our ongoing investigation."

Cpl. Jesse O'Donaghey, a spokesperson for the B.C. RCMP in the Southeast District, wrote in the statement that the impersonation of police officers is rare occurrence, but that anyone who suspects someone is doing so should call local police or Crime Stoppers.

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