British Columbia

Plumber Paul Myers donates $25M to Lions Gate Hospital

North Shore plumber Paul Myers has made what is believed to be the largest individual donation to a hospital foundation in British Columbia.

'I'm just a plumber who worked hard and had some good luck in my life,' he says

Unheralded plumber gives $25m to North Shore hospital 3:36

North Shore plumber Paul Myers has made what is believed to be the largest individual donation to a hospital foundation in British Columbia.

The 82-year-old gave $25 million to the Lions Gate Hospital Foundation, which will be used redevelop the 268-bed hospital, located in North Vancouver.

Paul Myers with one of his company's vans. He started with Keith Plumbing and Heating Company Ltd. as an apprentice in 1954. (Lionsgate Hospital Foundation)

"I'm just a plumber who worked hard and had some good luck in my life," said Myers in a release issued by the foundation.

"When I thought about where I could have the greatest impact, I immediately thought of Lions Gate Hospital ... and knew this is where I wanted to make a difference."

In 1954, Myers joined Keith Plumbing and Heating Company Ltd. as an apprentice and by 1970 he owned the outfit, which he transformed from a residential plumbing contractor to one of B.C.'s and the Yukon's largest mechanical contractors, employing up to 200 people, according to the company's website.

His philanthropy will help provide the best patient care in the province, said B.C. Health Minister Terry Lake.

"We thank him for his amazing gift, and recognize the role of the community, partners, and generous people like Paul play in providing great health care to residents of the North Shore," Lake is quoted as saying in the release.

Plans to redevelop Lions Gate Hospital have been ongoing for the past five years.

"This type of ongoing community participation is essential to us achieving our vision for LGH," said Mike Nader, chief operating officer of Vancouver Coastal Health.

Not a public person

Lions Gate Hospital's South Acute Tower will be renamed the Paul Myers Tower and will include signs and a plaque with his biography.

In interviews, Myers seemed surprised and at times bewildered by all the public attention he is getting because of his generous gift.

"I find myself quite overwhelmed by the publicity and whatnot because I'm not basically a public person," he told the CBC's Andrew Chang.

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